Tuesday, September 1, 2015

September's Theme Back To School



September is here again, and that means kids and young adults are off to school Weather it's elementary, middle, high school, or college everyone is going back.  With back to school comes the supply shopping. Supplies also include the food they eat. For children its their lunch time meals, and college students it would be all their food. This month we are going to inspire all ages with some healthy, fall recipes that are perfect for back to school! 

We found a great article it's called Beating The Freshmen 15

Everyone's heard warnings about the "freshman 15." But is it true that many college students pack on 15 pounds during their first year at school?
Recent studies find that some first-year students are indeed likely to gain weight — but it might not be the full freshman 15 and it may not all happen during freshman year. That might sound like good news, but it's not. Doctors are concerned that students who gradually put on pounds are establishing a pattern of weight gain that could spell trouble if it continues.
Studies show that students on average gain 3 to 10 pounds during their first 2 years of college. Most of this weight gain occurs during the first semester of freshman year.
College offers many temptations. You're on your own and free to eat what you want, when you want it. You can pile on the portions in the dining hall, eat dinners of french fries and ice cream, and indulge in sugary and salty snacks to fuel late-night study sessions. In addition, you may not get as much exercise as you did in high school.
College is also a time of change, and the stress of acclimating to school can trigger overeating. People sometimes eat in response to anxiety, homesickness, sadness, or stress, and all of these can be part of adapting to being away at school.
Some weight gain is normal as an adolescent body grows and metabolism shifts. But pronounced or rapid weight gain may become a problem.
Weight gain that pushes you above the body's normal range carries health risks. People who are overweight are more likely to have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, breathlessness, and joint problems. People who are overweight when they're younger have a greater likelihood of being overweight as adults. Poor diet and exercise habits in college can start you on a path that later could lead to heart disease, type 2 diabetes, or obesity, and may increase your risk for developing certain cancers.
Even without weight gain, unhealthy food choices also won't give you the balance of nutrients you need to keep up with the demands of college. You may notice that your energy lags and your concentration and memory suffer. Studies have found that most students get fewer than the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables each day.
If you do gain weight, don't freak out. Take a look at your eating and exercise habits and make adjustments. In a study in which freshmen gained 4 pounds in 12 weeks, the students were only eating an average of 174 extra calories each day. So cutting out one can of soda or a midnight snack every day and being more active will help you get back on track.
It may be tempting to go for the easy fix, like skipping meals or trying the latest fad diet. But these approaches don't work to keep weight off in the long run. It's best to make small adjustments to your diet that you know you can stick with.
For even more ideas and recipes check out our Pinterest! 

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